Key Facts

  • Renters and landlords are divided over the tenancy policies proposed under the new coalition.
  • The government will allow landlords to evict tenants without providing a reason or applying to the Tenancy Tribunal.
  • An additional pet bond will be introduced on top of existing bonds.
  • Renters’ United has expressed a need for increased renters rights under the new policies.
  • President of the Property Investors Federation, Sue Harrison, views the policies as a relief for landlords.
  • The coalition plans to restore mortgage interest deductibility for rental properties gradually, reaching full deduction by 2025/26.

Article Summary

The newly proposed tenancy policies have caused a rift between tenants and landlords. One particular policy that has caused controversy will allow landlords to evict tenants without providing a valid reason or seeking consent from the Tenancy Tribunal. Additional measures include an introduction of a pet bond, layered on top of existing bonds.

Renters’ United argued that these policies lack consideration for tenants’ rights. Éimhín O’Shea, National Organiser of the group, expressed his disappointment and flagged the possibility of resistance against what he views as no-cause evictions, perceiving them as damaging to renter-landlord relationships.

On the other hand, the President of the Property Investors Federation, Sue Harrison, has embraced the proposed policies, deeming them tenant-friendly and beneficial for landlords. She indicated that the policies will reignite interest in the rental market, possibly stemming the current trend of property owners selling off their rental properties.

Harrison also welcomed the coalition’s plan to reintroduce mortgage interest deductibility over the next few years. She contends that this measure will alleviate the financial strain on landlords due to increasing interest rates and taxes, ultimately benefitting both landlords and tenants.

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