Key Facts:

  • The region of Golden Bay in New Zealand does not have any government housing planned.
  • Social housing provider Kāinga Ora has announced developments for Nelson, but there are no plans for Golden Bay.
  • Kāinga Ora owns seven properties in Tākaka and leases five more in the Tasman district.
  • The executive officer of the Golden Bay/Mohua Affordable Housing Project challenges Kāinga Ora’s statement, saying there is a high need for public housing in the region.
  • The local demand for affordable housing in Golden Bay is significant, with waiting lists and expressions of interest exceeding available housing.
  • The shortage of housing in Golden Bay is partly due to outsiders buying holiday homes and removing housing stock from the market.

Article Summary:

Golden Bay in New Zealand will have to address its lack of affordable housing without government assistance, as Kāinga Ora, the housing provider, has no plans for homes in the region. While Kāinga Ora has announced developments for Nelson, including 49 homes in Nelson South and 13 new homes in Richmond, it considers Golden Bay a low priority for public housing. However, the executive officer of the Golden Bay/Mohua Affordable Housing Project argues that there is a high need for public housing in the region, pointing out the demand in smaller communities like Motueka and Upper Moutere. The shortage of housing in Golden Bay is also exacerbated by outsiders buying holiday homes and reducing available stock for local families.

The Golden Bay/Mohua Affordable Housing Project has completed six houses in just over two years, and there are plans for 14 flats for seniors or people with disabilities. However, the project was denied resource consent, resulting in the loss of government funding. Despite this setback, the project’s executive officer remains hopeful that it can progress due to the high demand for affordable housing in the region. Overall, there is a pressing need for affordable housing in Golden Bay, and local authorities are left to find ways to increase social housing without government support.

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