Key Facts:


– National and its potential coalition partner ACT plan to undo several of Labour’s legislative changes related to housing and tenancy laws in New Zealand.
– National has promised to restore no-cause evictions for rentals, allowing landlords to end tenancies without providing a reason.
– They also plan to allow people under 30 to use their KiwiSaver savings to pay for rental bonds, making it easier for young renters to afford upfront costs.
– National aims to end the automatic roll-over of fixed-term tenancies to periodic tenancies, giving landlords more flexibility in renting their properties.
– Some Labour changes, such as rental bidding bans and limited rent increases, may remain unchanged under a National-led government.

Article Summary:


National and ACT are planning to reverse some of Labour’s housing and tenancy law changes in New Zealand if they form the next government. One of the proposed changes is to restore no-cause evictions for rentals, allowing landlords to terminate tenancies without providing a reason. National also promises to allow people under 30 to use their KiwiSaver savings to pay for rental bonds, making it easier for young renters to afford upfront costs. They also plan to end the automatic roll-over of fixed-term tenancies to periodic tenancies, giving landlords more flexibility in renting their properties.

However, some Labour changes, such as the ban on rental bidding and limitations on rent increases, may remain in place under a National-led government. National also plans to bring back a tax break for landlords by restoring interest deductibility on rental properties. They also aim to reduce the bright-line test for taxing property sales from ten years to two years. Additionally, National intends to reverse some of Labour’s zoning reforms and overturn the ban on foreign buyers of residential properties.

It is important to note that coalition negotiations are still ongoing, and the final policies may be subject to change. Renters and property owners should stay updated on the outcomes of these negotiations and subsequent government policies.

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